Memorial Day 2016

President Barack Obama repeated the now infamous words of George W. Bush, declaring: “We are at war…” Yes, and we have been, ever since 1776.
President Barack Obama repeated the now infamous words of George W. Bush, declaring: “We are at war…” Yes, and we have been, ever since 1776.

The U.S. was born out of ethnic cleansing, a violent process that had started long before 1776 and would not be complete until 1900.  In other words, more than half of America’s existence (about 53%) has been marked by the active process of ethnic cleansing of the indigenous population, which was ultimately all but destroyed.

Below, Danios (from a blog dated December 20, 2011) has reproduced a year-by-year timeline of America’s wars, which reveals something quite interesting: since the United States was founded in 1776, she has been at war during 214 out of her 235 calendar years of existence.  In other words, there were only 21 calendar years in which the U.S. did not wage any wars.

To put this in perspective:

* Pick any year since 1776 and there is about a 91% chance that America was involved in some war during that calendar year.

* No U.S. president truly qualifies as a peacetime president.  Instead, all U.S. presidents can technically be considered “war presidents.”

* The U.S. has never gone a decade without war.

* The only time the U.S. went five years without war (1935-40) was during the isolationist period of the Great Depression.

Year-by-year Timeline of America’s Major Wars (1776-2011)

1776 – American Revolutionary War, Chickamagua Wars, Second Cherokee War, Pennamite-Yankee War

1777 – American Revolutionary War, Chickamauga Wars, Second Cherokee War, Pennamite-Yankee War

1778 – American Revolutionary War, Chickamauga Wars, Pennamite-Yankee War

1779 – American Revolutionary War, Chickamauga Wars, Pennamite-Yankee War

1780 – American Revolutionary War, Chickamauga Wars, Pennamite-Yankee War

1781 – American Revolutionary War, Chickamauga Wars, Pennamite-Yankee War

1782 – American Revolutionary War, Chickamauga Wars, Pennamite-Yankee War

1783 – American Revolutionary War, Chickamauga Wars, Pennamite-Yankee War

1784 – Chickamauga Wars, Pennamite-Yankee War, Oconee War

1785 – Chickamauga Wars, Northwest Indian War

1786 – Chickamauga Wars, Northwest Indian War

1787 – Chickamauga Wars, Northwest Indian War

1788 – Chickamauga Wars, Northwest Indian War

1789 – Chickamauga Wars, Northwest Indian War

1790 – Chickamauga Wars, Northwest Indian War

1791 – Chickamauga Wars, Northwest Indian War

1792 – Chickamauga Wars, Northwest Indian War

1793 – Chickamauga Wars, Northwest Indian War

1794 – Chickamauga Wars, Northwest Indian War

1795 – Northwest Indian War

1796 – No major war

1797 – No major war

1798 – Quasi-War

1799 – Quasi-War

1800 – Quasi-War

1801 – First Barbary War

1802 – First Barbary War

1803 – First Barbary War

1804 – First Barbary War

1805 – First Barbary War

1806 – Sabine Expedition

1807 – No major war

1808 – No major war

1809 – No major war

1810 – U.S. occupies Spanish-held West Florida

1811 – Tecumseh’s War

1812 – War of 1812, Tecumseh’s War, Seminole Wars, U.S. occupies Spanish-held Amelia Island and other parts of East Florida

1813 – War of 1812, Tecumseh’s War, Peoria War, Creek War, U.S. expands its territory in West Florida

1814 – War of 1812, Creek War, U.S. expands its territory in Florida, Anti-piracy war

1815 – War of 1812, Second Barbary War, Anti-piracy war

1816 – First Seminole War, Anti-piracy war

1817 – First Seminole War, Anti-piracy war

1818 – First Seminole War, Anti-piracy war

1819 – Yellowstone Expedition, Anti-piracy war

1820 – Yellowstone Expedition, Anti-piracy war

1821 – Anti-piracy war (see note above)

1822 – Anti-piracy war (see note above)

1823 – Anti-piracy war, Arikara War

1824 – Anti-piracy war

1825 – Yellowstone Expedition, Anti-piracy war

1826 – No major war

1827 – Winnebago War

1828 – No major war

1829 – No major war

1830 – No major war 

1831 – Sac and Fox Indian War

1832 – Black Hawk War

1833 – Cherokee Indian War

1834 – Cherokee Indian War, Pawnee Indian Territory Campaign

1835 – Cherokee Indian War, Seminole Wars, Second Creek War

1836 – Cherokee Indian War, Seminole Wars, Second Creek War, Missouri-Iowa Border War

1837 – Cherokee Indian War, Seminole Wars, Second Creek War, Osage Indian War, Buckshot War

1838 – Cherokee Indian War, Seminole Wars, Buckshot War, Heatherly Indian War

1839 – Cherokee Indian War, Seminole Wars

1840 – Seminole Wars, U.S. naval forces invade Fiji Islands

1841 – Seminole Wars, U.S. naval forces invade McKean Island, Gilbert Islands, and Samoa

1842 – Seminole Wars

1843 – U.S. forces clash with Chinese, U.S. troops invade African coast

1844 – Texas-Indian Wars

1845 – Texas-Indian Wars

1846 – Mexican-American War, Texas-Indian Wars

1847 – Mexican-American War, Texas-Indian Wars

1848 – Mexican-American War, Texas-Indian Wars, Cayuse War

1849 – Texas-Indian Wars, Cayuse War, Southwest Indian Wars, Navajo Wars, Skirmish between 1st Cavalry and Indians

1850 – Texas-Indian Wars, Cayuse War, Southwest Indian Wars, Navajo Wars, Yuma War, California Indian Wars, Pitt River Expedition

1851 – Texas-Indian Wars, Cayuse War, Southwest Indian Wars, Navajo Wars, Apache Wars, Yuma War, Utah Indian Wars, California Indian Wars

1852 – Texas-Indian Wars, Cayuse War, Southwest Indian Wars, Navajo Wars, Yuma War, Utah Indian Wars, California Indian Wars

1853 – Texas-Indian Wars, Cayuse War, Southwest Indian Wars, Navajo Wars, Yuma War, Utah Indian Wars, Walker War, California Indian Wars

1854 – Texas-Indian Wars, Cayuse War, Southwest Indian Wars, Navajo Wars, Apache Wars, California Indian Wars, Skirmish between 1st Cavalry and Indians

1855 – Seminole Wars, Texas-Indian Wars, Cayuse War, Southwest Indian Wars, Navajo Wars, Apache Wars, California Indian Wars, Yakima War, Winnas Expedition, Klickitat War, Puget Sound War, Rogue River Wars, U.S. forces invade Fiji Islands and Uruguay

1856 – Seminole Wars, Texas-Indian Wars, Southwest Indian Wars, Navajo Wars, California Indian Wars, Puget Sound War, Rogue River Wars, Tintic War

1857 – Seminole Wars, Texas-Indian Wars, Southwest Indian Wars, Navajo Wars, California Indian Wars, Utah War, Conflict in Nicaragua

1858 – Seminole Wars, Texas-Indian Wars, Southwest Indian Wars, Navajo Wars, Mohave War, California Indian Wars, Spokane-Coeur d’Alene-Paloos War, Utah War, U.S. forces invade Fiji Islands and Uruguay

1859 Texas-Indian Wars, Southwest Indian Wars, Navajo Wars, California Indian Wars, Pecos Expedition, Antelope Hills Expedition, Bear River Expedition, John Brown’s raid, U.S. forces launch attack against Paraguay, U.S. forces invade Mexico

1860 – Texas-Indian Wars, Southwest Indian Wars, Navajo Wars, Apache Wars, California Indian Wars, Paiute War, Kiowa-Comanche War

1861 – American Civil War, Texas-Indian Wars, Southwest Indian Wars, Navajo Wars, Apache Wars, California Indian Wars, Cheyenne Campaign

1862 – American Civil War, Texas-Indian Wars, Southwest Indian Wars, Navajo Wars, Apache Wars, California Indian Wars, Cheyenne Campaign, Dakota War of 1862,

1863 – American Civil War, Texas-Indian Wars, Southwest Indian Wars, Navajo Wars, Apache Wars, California Indian Wars, Cheyenne Campaign, Colorado War, Goshute War

1864 – American Civil War, Texas-Indian Wars, Navajo Wars, Apache Wars, California Indian Wars, Cheyenne Campaign, Colorado War, Snake War

1865 – American Civil War, Texas-Indian Wars, Navajo Wars, Apache Wars, California Indian Wars, Colorado War, Snake War, Utah’s Black Hawk War

1866 – Texas-Indian Wars, Navajo Wars, Apache Wars, California Indian Wars, Skirmish between 1st Cavalry and Indians, Snake War, Utah’s Black Hawk War, Red Cloud’s War, Franklin County War, U.S. invades Mexico, Conflict with China

1867 – Texas-Indian Wars, Long Walk of the Navajo, Apache Wars, Skirmish between 1st Cavalry and Indians, Snake War, Utah’s Black Hawk War, Red Cloud’s War, Comanche Wars, Franklin County War, U.S. troops occupy Nicaragua and attack Taiwan

1868 – Texas-Indian Wars, Long Walk of the Navajo, Apache Wars, Skirmish between 1st Cavalry and Indians, Snake War, Utah’s Black Hawk War, Red Cloud’s War, Comanche Wars, Battle of Washita River, Franklin County War

1869 – Texas-Indian Wars, Apache Wars, Skirmish between 1st Cavalry and Indians, Utah’s Black Hawk War, Comanche Wars, Franklin County War

1870 – Texas-Indian Wars, Apache Wars, Skirmish between 1st Cavalry and Indians, Utah’s Black Hawk War, Comanche Wars, Franklin County War

1871 – Texas-Indian Wars, Apache Wars, Skirmish between 1st Cavalry and Indians, Utah’s Black Hawk War, Comanche Wars, Franklin County War, Kingsley Cave Massacre, U.S. forces invade Korea

1872 – Texas-Indian Wars, Apache Wars, Utah’s Black Hawk War, Comanche Wars, Modoc War, Franklin County War

1873 – Texas-Indian Wars, Comanche Wars, Modoc War, Apache Wars, Cypress Hills Massacre, U.S. forces invade Mexico

1874 – Texas-Indian Wars, Comanche Wars, Red River War, Mason County War, U.S. forces invade Mexico

1875 – Conflict in Mexico, Texas-Indian Wars, Comanche Wars, Eastern Nevada, Mason County War, Colfax County War, U.S. forces invade Mexico

1876 – Texas-Indian Wars, Black Hills War, Mason County War, U.S. forces invade Mexico

1877 – Texas-Indian Wars, Skirmish between 1st Cavalry and Indians, Black Hills War, Nez Perce War, Mason County War, Lincoln County War, San Elizario Salt War, U.S. forces invade Mexico

1878 – Paiute Indian conflict, Bannock War, Cheyenne War, Lincoln County War, U.S. forces invade Mexico

1879 – Cheyenne War, Sheepeater Indian War, White River War, U.S. forces invade Mexico

1880 – U.S. forces invade Mexico

1881 – U.S. forces invade Mexico

1882 – U.S. forces invade Mexico

1883 – U.S. forces invade Mexico

1884 – U.S. forces invade Mexico

1885 – Apache Wars, Eastern Nevada Expedition, U.S. forces invade Mexico

1886 – Apache Wars, Pleasant Valley War, U.S. forces invade Mexico

1887 – U.S. forces invade Mexico

1888 – U.S. show of force against Haiti, U.S. forces invade Mexico

1889 – U.S. forces invade Mexico

1890 – Sioux Indian War, Skirmish between 1st Cavalry and Indians, Ghost Dance War, Wounded Knee, U.S. forces invade Mexico

1891 – Sioux Indian War, Ghost Dance War, U.S. forces invade Mexico

1892 – Johnson County War, U.S. forces invade Mexico

1893 – U.S. forces invade Mexico and Hawaii

1894 – U.S. forces invade Mexico

1895 – U.S. forces invade Mexico, Bannock Indian Disturbances

1896 – U.S. forces invade Mexico

1897 – No major war

1898 – Spanish-American War, Battle of Leech Lake, Chippewa Indian Disturbances

1899 – Philippine-American War, Banana Wars

1900 – Philippine-American War, Banana Wars

1901 – Philippine-American War, Banana Wars

1902 – Philippine-American War, Banana Wars

1903 – Philippine-American War, Banana Wars

1904 – Philippine-American War, Banana Wars

1905 – Philippine-American War, Banana Wars

1906 – Philippine-American War, Banana Wars

1907 – Philippine-American War, Banana Wars

1908 – Philippine-American War, Banana Wars

1909 – Philippine-American War, Banana Wars

1910 – Philippine-American War, Banana Wars

1911 – Philippine-American War, Banana Wars

1912 – Philippine-American War, Banana Wars

1913 – Philippine-American War, Banana Wars, New Mexico Navajo War

1914 – Banana Wars, U.S. invades Mexico

1915 – Banana Wars, U.S. invades Mexico, Colorado Paiute War

1916 – Banana Wars, U.S. invades Mexico

1917 – Banana Wars, World War I, U.S. invades Mexico

1918 – Banana Wars, World War I, U.S invades Mexico

1919 – Banana Wars, U.S. invades Mexico

1920 – Banana Wars

1921 – Banana Wars

1922 – Banana Wars

1923 – Banana Wars, Posey War

1924 – Banana Wars

1925 – Banana Wars

1926 – Banana Wars

1927 – Banana Wars

1928 – Banana Wars

1930 – Banana Wars

1931 – Banana Wars

1932 – Banana Wars

1933 – Banana Wars

1934 – Banana Wars

1935 – No major war

1936 – No major war

1937 – No major war

1938 – No major war

1939 – No major war

1940 – No major war

1941 – World War II

1942 – World War II

1943 – Wold War II

1944 – World War II

1945 – World War II

1946 – Cold War (U.S. occupies the Philippines and South Korea)

1947 – Cold War (U.S. occupies South Korea, U.S. forces land in Greece to fight Communists)

1948 – Cold War (U.S. forces aid Chinese Nationalist Party against Communists)

1949 – Cold War (U.S. forces aid Chinese Nationalist Party against Communists)

1950 – Korean War, Jayuga Uprising

1951 – Korean War

1952 – Korean War

1953 – Korean War

1954 – Covert War in Guatemala

1955 – Vietnam War

1956 – Vietnam War

1957 – Vietnam War

1958 – Vietnam War

1959 – Vietnam War, Conflict in Haiti

1960 – Vietam War

1961 – Vietnam War

1962 – Vietnam War, Cold War (Cuban Missile Crisis; U.S. marines fight Communists in Thailand)

1963 – Vietnam War

1964 – Vietnam War

1965 – Vietnam War, U.S. occupation of Dominican Republic

1966 – Vietnam War, U.S. occupation of Dominican Republic

1967 – Vietnam War

1968 – Vietnam War

1969 – Vietnam War

1970 – Vietnam War

1971 – Vietnam War

1972 – Vietnam War

1973 – Vietnam War, U.S. aids Israel in Yom Kippur War

1974 – Vietnam War

1975 – Vietnam War

1976 – No major war

1977 – No major war

1978 – No major war

1979 – Cold War (CIA proxy war in Afghanistan)

1980 – Cold War (CIA proxy war in Afghanistan)

1981 – Cold War (CIA proxy war in Afghanistan and Nicaragua), First Gulf of Sidra Incident

1982 – Cold War (CIA proxy war in Afghanistan and Nicaragua), Conflict in Lebanon

1983 – Cold War (Invasion of Grenada, CIA proxy war in Afghanistan and Nicaragua), Conflict in Lebanon

1984 – Cold War (CIA proxy war in Afghanistan and Nicaragua), Conflict in Persian Gulf

1985 – Cold War (CIA proxy war in Afghanistan and Nicaragua)

1986 – Cold War (CIA proxy war in Afghanistan and Nicaragua)

1987 – Conflict in Persian Gulf

1988 – Conflict in Persian Gulf, U.S. occupation of Panama

1989 – Second Gulf of Sidra Incident, U.S. occupation of Panama, Conflict in Philippines

1990 – First Gulf War, U.S. occupation of Panama

1991 – First Gulf War

1992 – Conflict in Iraq

1993 – Conflict in Iraq

1994 – Conflict in Iraq, U.S. invades Haiti

1995 – Conflict in Iraq, U.S. invades Haiti, NATO bombing of Bosnia and Herzegovina

1996 – Conflict in Iraq

1997 – No major war

1998 – Bombing of Iraq, Missile strikes against Afghanistan and Sudan

1999 – Kosovo War

2000 – No major war

2001 – War on Terror in Afghanistan

2002 – War on Terror in Afghanistan and Yemen

2003 – War on Terror in Afghanistan, and Iraq

2004 – War on Terror in Afghanistan, Iraq, Pakistan, and Yemen

2005 – War on Terror in Afghanistan, Iraq, Pakistan, and Yemen

2006 – War on Terror in Afghanistan, Iraq, Pakistan, and Yemen

2007 – War on Terror in Afghanistan, Iraq, Pakistan, Somalia, and Yemen

2008 – War on Terror in Afghanistan, Iraq, Pakistan, and Yemen

2009 – War on Terror in Afghanistan, Iraq, Pakistan, and Yemen

2010 – War on Terror in Afghanistan, Iraq, Pakistan, and Yemen

2011 – War on Terror in Afghanistan, Iraq, Pakistan, Somalia, and Yemen; Conflict in Libya (Libyan Civil War)

It should be noted that American plans to dominate the Middle East date back to at least the end of World War II, when it was decided that the region was of critical strategic value. Now that the U.S. has followed through on this plan, do you think “radical Islam” is really “an existential threat” just as American Indians were “fierce savages” waging “an exterminating war” against the “peaceful inhabitants” of the United States; or how Mexicans were “violent” and “terrorized” people; or how Central Americans were “dangerous bandits”? The rampant Islamophobia that abounds today is part of a long tradition of vilifying, Other-izing, and dehumanizing the indigenous populations of lands that need to controlled.

Happy Memorial day…

The Infamous ManPower Papers

American Religious Police State


 

In 1961 at the behest of the Armstrongs a “manpower committee” comprising 15 of the leading men of Ambassador College (AC) was formed. The noble purpose of this committee was to evaluate AC students-especially male students-and determine whether or not to employ them at AC or in the Worldwide Church of God (WCG) upon graduation. The Manpower Committee, however, quickly degenerated into a high-level gossip session in which a group of corporate misfits combined to destroy the reputation of numerous students whose only offense may have been intellectual resistance to the doctrinal intimidation and personal prejudices of AC/WCG officials while attending to their formal education.

Before any discussion of a student began, his picture was projected onto a screen. Then, as the members of this “spiritual jury” stared at the student’s image, each one of them divulged information – often given to them confidentially in private counseling sessions – gathered on the student. This information often included a student’s background, racial and genetic heritage, sex and dating problems, attitudes, and physique, in addition to biased personal assessments of a student’s potential worth to the organization.

Below Ambassador Report is reprinting a number of statements made in these manpower meetings that aptly illustrate the mentality of the Ambassador College administration in the 1960s. Little if any concrete evidence for the allegations, innuendos, or rumors in the following quotations was ever formally submitted, probably because it never existed. All students were tried in absentia and never given a chance to reply to the biased information disseminated in these meetings that sullied their reputations. Yet the essence of what was said in these meetings was carefully typed and distributed to several leading men at AC in Pasadena, the vice-chancellor of AC’s Texas campus, and AC’s Personnel Office. (In order to protect the identity and reputation of the students mentioned in the following statements, we will refer to all male students as “X” and to all females students as “Y.” We have gone to great lengths to delete anything that we felt could lead to the identification of a student.)

RACIST COMMENTS

“Like most Negroes he is reserved, timid, and not as warm and spontaneous as he could be…. Most of our Negro leaders are partially white and don’t have the normal dull mind of the average Negro.”

“X has a lot of ego. He is a Jew, and a Jew feeds upon applause, people appreciating him, living in the limelight, being a performer, so they are hard to convert-but once converted Jews can be the best instrument in God’s hands there is.”

Mr. Meredith feels a lot of this apparent haughtiness and cockiness is the results of the English class distinction bred in him…. The English people tend to be that way…. The English do this naturally.”

“He is converted, yet like most Germans, is hard to love…. It is most imperative that we all get to know him.”

COMMENTS ON SEX PROBLEMS

“He has had a sex problem since he was ten or twelve years of age; and since he came to college he has been able to overcome it several months at a time, but continually lapses back into it.”

“He is all but a practicing homosexual, has a masturbation problem, and apparently is only here to protect himself from the draft.”

“He is starry-eyed, has a glassy stare when speaking, is hard to listen to because of his poor eye contact-this may be a result of excessive masturbation in the past.”

“X was disfellowshipped from the Church several years ago because of homosexual problems.”

“She comes from a mother dominated home, a pragmatic home, and she needs a ‘he man’ to solve her problems.”

“Y has an excellent I.Q. of 123, but is neurotic…. She is unbalanced, she has sex problems and has masturbated from the time she was about 12 years of age…. She had an affair with a man in the… Church. She doesn’t fit here, she is a wrong influence. She shows definite deep influence from demons.”

“She acts like a lesbian, but is not-her fear and dislike for men is a result of demon influence as well as the result of an affair she had with a man that discussed her with men. She and her family have consulted spirits in the past….”

“He often looks glassy eyed, is washed out, enervated, which is unusual because he works out with weights and is athletic…. It’s interesting-he gave an Attack Speech this morning on masturbation-people tend to attack most vociferously the very thing they are fighting.”

“And although we would not say he is a weird personality, he has a few, weird, creepy characteristics. Dr. Hoeh wondered if he doesn’t have mental sexual problems, that he may be an intellectual homosexual, not that he’s ever physically committed such an act, but does he think about [it] ? We need to sound him out and find out.”

“Y has had dating problems with the fellows, a strong sex drive, a record of instability…”

“He does confess to mentally fornicating with our girls every day of his life. Before he came into the church he used to masturbate twice a day-he is a sexual pervert in his mind. He has had demon problems….”

“X was also discussed as a possible man for the Sermonette List, but when we found he was also guilty of necking (though done very lightly), he was rejected from the Sermonette List…. Mr. Apartian had talked to X before and will talk to him again to find out whether this was a quick goodnight kiss or could be classified as petting.”

MARRIAGE MANIPULATION

“Mr. Smith said whoever counsels them in the final outcome should certainly write her father and tell him we will do all we can to discourage her marriage if he wants us to…. After further discussion we all feel best to advise them to throw cold water on it….”

“Mr. Meredith has already counselled him to postpone any engagement plans, primarily because Mrs. Armstrong was horrified when she heard about them.”

“The Manpower Committee saw no objections to a marriage sometime in June.”

“Mr. Hill said X had counselled him about marrying Y…. Dr. Hoeh did not feel, however, that she should tie herself down to him-she is a terrific girl, should be a Minister’s wife.…”

“Mr. Armstrong just recently made an ironclad rule that any Senior who wants to marry a Freshman is automatically out of college and if he doesn’t take that in a right attitude is out of the Church.”

“X and Y were making marriage plans when advised to put it in God’s hands, break off the wedding plans, and wait until a later date…. it is doubtful she can be sure she and X are actually in love.”

“Mr. Portune said he called the engagement between X and Y off-that he did not believe X was stable enough or ready for marriage.”

“Mr. Elliott brought up the problem of Senior men speaking for Freshmen girls a few weeks after they have arrived on campus…. We are not bringing girls to Ambassador College to marry Senior students after only being here a month or two-we are bringing them here to train them to be wives and mothers, which should mean at least two years at Ambassador College.”

“X was going steadily with Y until Dr. Hoeh counselled him to consider marrying a Russian…. Mr. Portune brought out, however, that he had counselled them and told them that they could not get married for a year and a half after graduation and they both know that they cannot get married…. These students need to learn that unless God is with them they have no business getting married in the first place…. Let’s give them the test, make them… quit running from one minister to the next… and wait the year and a half after graduation as Mr. Portune told them to do in the first place…. Take the emphasis off sex and marriage and get it on the desire to seek the Kingdom of God.”

“Y and X are in love, but they were told they must not get married until the Feast of Tabernacles, 196- [1½ years after this was written]. This will be quite a trial on both of them.”

“He has effeminate tendencies and is definitely a fringer. We need to tell him we don’t want to live his fife, but we advise him not to get married-that the marriage will not work….”

“Now Y is over there and she is getting romantically involved with a weak student named X. His stock is weak. If we were cattle raisers we would not begin to allow such mating to take place. Breeding is very important.”

“X is too close to Y, we need to break them up-either he goes or she goes. He is too polished, he needs Texas [Ambassador College’s Texas campus), he needs to get a little manure under his fingernails….”

“He is interested in Y…. Mr. Apartian mentioned being disappointed with both of their attitudes, because he told them to break it off-but she loves him…. She is sanctimonious, like he is, and we only have eight years left anyhow [8 years till 1975, the year the WCG predicted Christ would return].”

“Mr. Portune… says he [X]… is a clod… a clown in the eyes of the other students, a prolific eater-eats everything in sight. X is only $15 in debt. He wants to marry Y. She… comes from good stock, is a nice-looking girl, beautifully shaped, and is only $438 in debt. Mr. Hill [said X]… has an odd approach, hasn’t produced, and can’t identify himself with the problems. He is like an unemotional fish and needs to attack something and get stirred up. Mr. Blackwell wondered then if it might not be best to… separate he and Y for awhile… and let him know this is it-sink or swim.”

“Dr. Zimmerman… counseled him… to put cold water on his plans with Y…. During the past summer he was sent to… look for work, primarily to separate he and Y…. He later came back to ask Dr. Zimmerman to ask again for approval to get married. Dr. Zimmerman told him again to throw cold water on it…. X felt he could…. Dr. Zimmerman doesn’t feel any consideration should be given him toward marriage, that he should be told again to put cold water on it. Mr. Meredith said he should be told not to even think about marriage for one or two years at least”

GENERAL COMMENTS

“X is odd, he came to talk to Mr. Meredith about his inability to sweat in prayer, after Mr. Meredith’s sermon on really putting your heart and all your being into prayer….”

“X was told he must lose five pounds a month.”

“X is also odd, finky, but has a good mind…. He has been too steeped in music….”

“He was recently given a lie detector’s test which shows him to be a liar and a thief, but since the test is not infallible, and he staunchly maintains his innocence, we cannot be sure that he is a thief and liar. The lie detector records only conscious thought, however, and he was grilled for more than eight hours….”

“X is… very hard to get to know-there is always a question in our minds as to what is going on in his mind.”

“X… has had a perpetual health problem (constipation).”

“Y is weird; she is not normal; she is extremely neurotic. We wouldn’t be surprised if she didn’t someday try to destroy herself….”

“Some of the students just had a big party at which they played questionable music, with a wrong beat, drank too many beers, got involved in the wrong kind of dancing….”

“Mr. Meredith, when reading about the wretched background he [X] came from, added that X’s mother and father get in real “knock-down-and-drag-out” fights, get involved in sexual perversion, and have a wretched relationship. She has a Pentecostal background.”

“Mr. [Ted] Armstrong read the resume for X and the comments made at previous Man-Power Meetings-with the comment that X is an ‘ass.’… Being an ass is no condemnation, it is far better to be an ass than to be effeminate, a weakling, or a problem.”

“Mr. Garner Ted Armstrong opened the meeting…. Mr. Armstrong further stressed the need for pooling our information from both colleges [Ambassador College’s campuses in Pasadena and in Big Sandy] by receiving their [man-power] notes for graduating seniors and supplying them with ours.”

“Mr. Armstrong could see no reason why they should not get married. His future is already mapped out for him.”

“He is somewhat boyish… having been reared without a man in the house, and has taken on many womanish ways-although we don’t feel he is effeminate.”

“After the previous Man-Power comments were read on X, it was brought out that he is a product of his environment. Richard Plache said his father is extremely odd, a character, is self-righteous, egotistical, and is a constant problem. Like his father, he goes to bed at night wanting to die…. he has a clinging, fishy handshake, showing complete lack of strength, character, etc…. Mr. Meredith explained the need for all of us, as Man Power Committee members, to get beneath the veneer of these men and fully know their problems….”

“Mr. Meredith… said… he is dull…. Richard Plache added… that… X’s parents have the same slow, dull, sluggish ways In fact, he has a younger brother who is far worse than he is-is much more buffoonish , duller, and has almost no life or spark at all. Mr. Portune feels… we could send him out for a trial as a warm body… to the minister and assist the minister in some of the routine visits.”

“Mr. Armstrong read the previous evaluations of X which included comments on his family background…. He is in love with Y and they eventually want to get married. Mr. Armstrong found it a little hard to understand a mutual attraction between them…. He is sincere and he assures us he really loves Y and that there is a mutual physical attraction as well as the intellectual. Most of us might not find her attractive because of her thick wrists and ankles and blocky build….”

“Mr. Armstrong said the Admissions Committee needs to be more strict and forceful in turning down people who have physical handicaps”

“Y is not a very pretty girl, she is not a great intellect, but she will make someone a very fine wife.”

“Neither Mr. Armstrong nor Mr. Meredith feel that this is the right girl for X; she is a peasant-type girl, is slightly dumb and immature.”

“Mr. Hill… says there are no problems except for a few effeminate flareups now and then, a womanish tendency, but he does have good dignity, a good mind….”

“He is a liar, a fink, a queer, and has lost job after job.”

“X has a self-righteous attitude. He… has a semirebellious attitude… is another one of those whom we cannot seem to get to know.”

“He continues to show disrespect for authority, talks disparagingly of the leaders of the work over the breakfast table… has many signs of hidden rebellion. His children are constantly on the spanking list at school…. He is a dirty player, fouls others continually.”

“X appears to have a bad attitude some, or most of the time. The whole attitude of that family has never been too good.”

“We need to get to know X and jar him into cooperation….”

“X is weak, effeminate, unable to rule his house and unable to master his marital problems”

“He is slow, dull, unable to think, and is all but completely lacking in zeal.”

“X is a hard worker, but he doesn’t seem to know his own mind.”

“She had a breakdown in Mr. Buzzard’s class the other day-she couldn’t stop crying. We don’t want ‘odd’ people-people obviously demon influenced. We should not hesitate to kick her out at the end of this semester, unless there is a drastic change.”

“He is not emotionally unstable as girls normally are, nevertheless, he does have an emotional problem.”

“X is still somewhat girlish, although not queer; he lacks the strong masculine quality. He has a weak voice like Richard Nixon….”

“He did finally come to talk to Mr. Elliott, he told about kissing in the bedroom, where another student saw him, but he didn’t tell everything. He went behind the science class building, behind Mr. Meredith’s house, and fondled her breasts, etc., and she is the one who told this to Mr. Elliott.”

“Mr. Ted Armstrong said there are still security leaks in our manpower committee that must be stopped. Word got back to X that we had discussed him in a recent manpower meeting, but what he heard was 5th or 6th hand, perverted, warped, and only a small percent correct.”

“Unless he goes into the field [ministry], the draft may snatch him up. Someway we need to legally classify him as doing ministerial work of some nature. Mr. Hill classified X as an assistant to him, dealing with theological responsibilities, as a ministerial assistant, and he was reclassified without any problem. He suggests we write the same kind of letter he did to the draft board…. ”

“X took Y, W, V, Z, and the girls signed out to go to the Student Dance. Instead they went to a football game, and when it didn’t prove exciting enough they went to a park and played touch football themselves. Some other people joined the party… and they wound upgoing to the sister’s house of one of the people they met and staying till 2:30 in the morning dancing and drinking. When they brought the girls back they were fearful of getting caught so they dropped the girls off on Orange Grove Boulevard. The girls cut through the Orange Grove Manor property and signed in-but they falsified their time…. His father is cocky, conceited, has constant financial problems… is often bothered with demons, etc.”

“…the sewage of X’s activity continues to flow through to us He is one of the worst scum who has ever walked across this campus”

Ambassador Report feels that the manpower mentality still predominates at AC. Some have cited the discontinuation of the comprehensive Manpower Committee in 1970 as a sign that all is now well. However, a memorandum from the committee’s chairman, Gainer Ted Armstrong, indicates that there is still cause for concern:

“…it will be no handicap whatever for various departments to obtain useful information about prospective employees, or for a smaller group to make requests concerning prospective ministerial assistants….” (Memorandum to All Committee Members, Manpower, Jan. 8, 1970.)

Most of the men who made the assessments and final decisions in manpower meetings are still college administrators, student counselors, department heads, or policymakers for the general student body. They still advise and counsel students, becoming familiar with each student’s most intimate problems. Yet the mentality of many of these men remains basically unchanged to this day. It is painfully obvious from their sermons and articles that their positions of prejudice and disregard for students’ rights still exist, public pronouncements to the contrary. The reason these harmful prejudices still exist is because the mentality of “ministerial privilege” has never been significantly discouraged nor discontinued from private practice among Ambassador executives.

Ambassador Report feels that student and public awareness of AC’s disregard for its students’ rights is imperative in order to discourage further abuse by members of the administration. Also, we encourage all AC students to be aware that what they reveal to AC counselors and/or WCG ministers may one day be used against them or passed on to others.

A reliable source inside AC has informed us that one administrator currently secretly records his counselings with students and church members and later has the conversations typed by his secretary for future reference. In light of this report, we feel the need to notify all AC students of their legal right to complete confidentiality in matters of spiritual guidance and their right not to have their personal problems and identities divulged to AC or WCG officials for reasons of employment or any reason whatsoever.

California law clearly states that under no circumstance is a minister allowed to divulge or otherwise disseminate information supplied to him by an individual seeking spiritual guidance. Confidentiality is implied, and any breach of this confidence (especially for reasons of discrimination in employment) is prosecutable under the law.